1. johnthelutheran:

rhube:

jenniferrpovey:

jumpingjacktrash:

becausegoodheroesdeservekidneys:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts

YOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
Senegal, Mauritania, Mali, Burkina Faso, Niger, Nigeria, Chad, Sudan, Eritrea, Ethiopia, and Djibouti. Those are the countries. It will be drought-resistant species, mostly acacias. And this is a fucking brilliant idea you have no idea oh my Christ
This will create so many jobs and regenerate so many communities and aaaaaahhhhhhh

more info here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Green_Wall
it’s already happening, and already having positive effects. this is wonderful, why have i not heard of this before? i’m so happy!

Oh yes, acacia trees.
They fix nitrogen and improve soil quality.
And, to make things fun, the species they’re using practices “reverse leaf phenology.” The trees go dormant in the rainy season and then grow their leaves again in the dry season. This means you can plant crops under the trees, in that nitrogen-rich soil, and the trees don’t compete for light because they don’t have any leaves on.
And then in the dry season, you harvest the leaves and feed them to your cows.
Crops grown under acacia trees have better yield than those grown without them. Considerably better.
So, this isn’t just about stopping the advancement of the Sahara - it’s also about improving food security for the entire sub-Saharan belt and possibly reclaiming some of the desert as productive land.
Of course, before the “green revolution,” the farmers knew to plant acacia trees - it’s a traditional practice that they were convinced to abandon in favor of “more reliable” artificial fertilizers (that caused soil degradation, soil erosion, etc).
This is why you listen to the people who, you know, have lived with and on land for centuries.

Fantastic.

The Great Green Wall, to resist the encroachment of the Sahara. Fascinating.

    johnthelutheran:

    rhube:

    jenniferrpovey:

    jumpingjacktrash:

    becausegoodheroesdeservekidneys:

    ultrafacts:

    Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts

    YOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

    Senegal, Mauritania, Mali, Burkina Faso, Niger, Nigeria, Chad, Sudan, Eritrea, Ethiopia, and Djibouti. Those are the countries. It will be drought-resistant species, mostly acacias. And this is a fucking brilliant idea you have no idea oh my Christ

    This will create so many jobs and regenerate so many communities and aaaaaahhhhhhh

    more info here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Green_Wall

    it’s already happening, and already having positive effects. this is wonderful, why have i not heard of this before? i’m so happy!

    Oh yes, acacia trees.

    They fix nitrogen and improve soil quality.

    And, to make things fun, the species they’re using practices “reverse leaf phenology.” The trees go dormant in the rainy season and then grow their leaves again in the dry season. This means you can plant crops under the trees, in that nitrogen-rich soil, and the trees don’t compete for light because they don’t have any leaves on.

    And then in the dry season, you harvest the leaves and feed them to your cows.

    Crops grown under acacia trees have better yield than those grown without them. Considerably better.

    So, this isn’t just about stopping the advancement of the Sahara - it’s also about improving food security for the entire sub-Saharan belt and possibly reclaiming some of the desert as productive land.

    Of course, before the “green revolution,” the farmers knew to plant acacia trees - it’s a traditional practice that they were convinced to abandon in favor of “more reliable” artificial fertilizers (that caused soil degradation, soil erosion, etc).

    This is why you listen to the people who, you know, have lived with and on land for centuries.

    Fantastic.

    The Great Green Wall, to resist the encroachment of the Sahara. Fascinating.

    (via wreck-in-a-box)

    13 hours ago  /  61,852 notes  /  Source: ultrafacts

  2. photo

    The High Line, Manhattan, New York | Posted by CJWHO.com

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    The High Line, Manhattan, New York | Posted by CJWHO.com

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    The High Line, Manhattan, New York | Posted by CJWHO.com

    photo

    The High Line, Manhattan, New York | Posted by CJWHO.com

    photo

    The High Line, Manhattan, New York | Posted by CJWHO.com

    photo

    The High Line, Manhattan, New York | Posted by CJWHO.com

    photo

    The High Line, Manhattan, New York | Posted by CJWHO.com

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    The High Line, Manhattan, New York | Posted by CJWHO.com

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    The High Line, Manhattan, New York | Posted by CJWHO.com

    14 hours ago  /  5,394 notes  /  Source: cjwho

  3. #ecosentido

    #ecosentido

    (via landscape-a-design)

    3 days ago  /  44 notes  /  Source: sustain-better-business

  4. La Chirola from Vatelón on Vimeo.

    Filmado con: Panasonic AG-HVX-200 P2 - La Paz, Bolivia 2008

    3 days ago  /  0 notes

  5. INFOGRAFÍA / Caracas, ciudad de las guacamayas.

    ecoturismope:

    image

    Los habitantes de Caracas, capital de Venezuela, son testigos de que a diario gran cantidad de guacamayos y guacamayas colorean libremente el cielo de la ciudad, razón por la cual ésta es considerada su principal morada.No hay otra ciudad latinoamericana que goce de esa particularidad. 

    Read More

    3 weeks ago  /  6 notes  /  Source: ecoturismope

  6. ecowatchorg:

Styrene Officially Linked to Cancer
Just this week, the National Research Council (NRC) signed off on the National Toxicology Program’s decision to list styrene as “reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen” in its latest report on carcinogens.
SEE MORE:
http://ecowatch.com/2014/07/29/styrene-officially-linked-to-cancer/

    ecowatchorg:

    Styrene Officially Linked to Cancer

    Just this week, the National Research Council (NRC) signed off on the National Toxicology Program’s decision to list styrene as “reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen” in its latest report on carcinogens.

    SEE MORE:

    http://ecowatch.com/2014/07/29/styrene-officially-linked-to-cancer/

    1 month ago  /  19 notes  /  Source: ecowatch.com

  7. tabletopwhale:

I made a chart of some bioluminescent species! Full image on tabletopwhale.com 

    tabletopwhale:

    I made a chart of some bioluminescent species! Full image on tabletopwhale.com 

    (via scientificillustration)

    1 month ago  /  1,942 notes  /  Source: tabletopwhale

  8. photo

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    1 month ago  /  1,100 notes  /  Source: micdotcom

  9. photo

    Photo by Steven A. Holt

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    Photo by Kim Smith

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    Photo by Joel Sartore

    1 month ago  /  4,837 notes  /  Source: sci-universe